Termite Season is once again knocking at the door

Termite season will arrive in just a few weeks. When the weather breaks, the termites will begin to swarm. Swarming is when the new reproductive termites take flight looking for a new place to call home. The termite swarm will usually occur on a sunny, humid morning. Termite Swarmers - AlatesOnce the termites have swarmed, they find a mate, and attempt to return to the soil to begin a new life. Most of the swarming termites will die. If they swarm inside a house, they die. When they swarm outside, other predators such as birds, lizards, spiders, and other insects will dine on the termites.

Many homeowners ask what they can do to protect their home. The first step is to have a qualified pest control technician inspect the home. The Bug Man offers a free termite inspection and evaluation. The inspection and evaluation takes between 30-60 minutes, depending on the type and size of home you have. Our technicians are all certified with the State and will provide a detailed report of each inspection, and even photo document any concerns. The next step is to design a gameplay to protect your home. This could include a treatment of the home or we may recommend having the home checked again in 12-18 months. The Bug Man features Termidor HE, America’s number 1 Termite Termite WorkersDefense! And The Bug Man is a locally owned and operated company, established in 2001.

Spring is the time termites swarm, so now is the time to have a checkup.  If your home has not been properly inspected in the past 2 years, now is the time to act.  Don’t wait until you see a problem, be proactive.

Don’t wait, contact The Bug Man today and ensure your house is protected!  We can be reached at 615-217-7284 or email us service@thebugman.us

Fire Ants found in middle Tennessee

Are there fire ants in middle Tennessee and Murfreesboro?

Fire AntsI am asked frequently if fire ants are found in middle Tennessee.  The short answer to that question is Yes!  The first documented case of imported fire ants in Tennessee was back in 1987 in Hardin County.  Since then, the fire ants have been spreading across the state at a rapid pace.  Each year since 2001 when we started The Bug Man, we have seen increased activity and had increased customer calls requesting fire ant control.

Fire ants have been found in the Murfreesboro, Smyrna, and Christiana this past week and they are active!  We have sited them at local parks and sports complexes, in the median strips in parking lots, and even while out camping this past weekend in Oliver Spings, Tn.  The imported fire ants are taking over at a rapid pace.

Fire ants are easy to locate, look for the mounds

Imported fire ant nests are easy to locate once they are built.  The ants build large mounds in the soil that can be over a foot tall and two feet wide.  The nests can extend into the ground up to 3 feet and spread out a few feet past the width of the visible nest.  Please, Do NOT disturb these nests.  A typical nest can have between 80,000 and 250,000 stinging ants in the colony!  Keep children and pets away, as the fire ants are dangerous when defending their nest.  When a fire ant nest is disturbed, all of the ants surface and begin to attack and sting any intruder.  They will climb up a stick or other device that was used to disturb the nest and sting the one holding it.  They will also swarm your feet and climb your legs, and sting!  The resulting stings will cause puss-filled blisters and will last few days to weeks.  This is not fun.  Growing up in Florida, I know personally what it feels like to be stung repetitively by fire ants.

If you find imported fire ant mounds when out around town, please leave them be.  If you locate them on you property, it is best to have them eliminated for the safety of your children and pets.  This can be done professionally by The Bug Man or you can visit a local store and purchase products to do-it-yourself.  If you choose the do-it-yourself option, please be sure to read and follow all label directions and be sure to wear your personal protective equipment.  Be safe!  I am including a link here to the University of Georgia that discusses in more detail the fire ants and the how to control them.

The video below shows what a typical fire ant nest looks like and how active they become once the nest is disturbed.  We do not recommend disturbing a fire ant nest.

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Ticks in Tennessee will be active this year

Ticks in Tennessee during the summer can be very frustrating. Actually, as I wrote this Ticks in Tennesseeblog there were several words describing ticks that floated to the surface: creepy, gross, worrisome, concerning… just to name a few. Mostly, people are very fearful. Not really about the tick, itself, but more about the diseases caused by the bite of a tick.

The best cure for tickborne dieases such as Lyme Disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is to avoid getting bitten by ticks.

This is another one of those situations where pest-related problems concern our health. Since we are in the business of pest control and are not health professionals, we generally prefer not to comment on the medical conditions caused by the pest. We do recommend  information on the CDC site titled Symptoms of Tickborne Illness. If you have health symptoms that you suspect may be caused by a tick or other pest then we suggest that you contact your physician. What we can do is educate you on tick control in order to reduce the chance that you may be bitten by a tick.

Ticks are arachnids, not insects, and classified as an external parasite.

A lot of people are surprised to learn that ticks are actually in the same family (arachnid) as spiders, mites, and scorpions. They have 8 jointed legs and no antennae. They require  a blood meal from a host in order to survive. A tick will attach firmly while they slowly feed on the blood of their host. They will feed, unnoticed, for several days before they release their grasp. They will feed on mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians.

There have been many species of ticks found in Tennessee. The three most common species are the American dog tick, lone star tick, and brown dog tick. All of these common ticks have four life stages- egg, larva, nymph, and adult. According to Dr. Karen Vail in her article titled Common Ticks of Tennessee and Their Control, each of the stages, other than the egg, requires a separate animal host to complete its development, which all together may be two or three years long. Each blood-engorged female leaves her host animal and lays a single mass of 3,000 to 6,000 eggs.

Ticks in Tennessee are most active from April through September. Though, it is not uncommon to see some tick activity through the winter months. During periods of high activity we recommend that you remain extra vigilant. Avoid areas known to be infested with ticks such as wooded and bushy areas with high grass and leaf litter. If you have to walk though these types of areas we recommend that you apply a repellent according label directions. Also, walk in the center of trails to avoid brushing up against vegetation.

Wear long sleeve shirts and pants. Tuck your pants into your socks to prevent ticks from climbing up the inside of the pant legs. Also, wear light-colored clothing so that you can detect ticks more easily. Upon returning from tick infested areas make sure to thoroughly check your body for ticks. You will want to quickly remove all ticks that are found.

Modify your environment to make it less desirable to ticks

Maybe you’re not going on a hike in the woods but you want to reduce or prevent a tick infestation around your home. There are several non-chemical things that you can do:

Make your surroundings less inviting to rodents and wildlife. They are often carriers of ticks. Reduce the rodents and you will reduce the ticks. It’s a win-win situation.

  • Repair areas where rodents can enter the home.
  • Remove wood piles and debris that make a good nesting area for rodents.
  • Keep pet food stored in sealed containers
  • Keep the lawn mowed and weeds to a minimum

    Lincoln is a tick free dog
    Lincoln is our precious golden doodle

Don’t forget about your four-legged babies, too. Please discuss tick treatment for your pets with a veterinarian.  There are many treatment methods available and something that works well for one pet may not be best for the other. Cats and some breeds of dogs can be sensitive to some products. So, it is always best to check with your vet, first. Also, you will want to inspect your pets and their bedding frequently for ticks.

The final measure for tick management is to hire a professional such as The Bug Man in Murfreesboro to treat the exterior of your home. Our technicians are very knowledgeable about areas that make a great tick habitat and areas that don’t. Most people are surprised to learn that ticks will avoid direct sunlight. So, treating the entire lawn is rarely necessary. We have noticed that customers on our mosquito program usually do not have a problem with ticks. This is probably due to the fact that mosquitoes and ticks have similar habitats such as the trees, shrubs, and shaded areas. Check out our blog, Mosquitoes… The Bug Man to the rescue and contact our office at 615-217-7284 if we can answer any questions for you.

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Indian Meal Moths: Silently Lurking in the Kitchen

Nothing makes me shudder more than the thought of indian meal moths in my food pantry. We all have our bug fears & rants. Mine happens to be this evil little time gobbler of an insect that invades our food. This particular blog is personal for me, today. If you have not heard or experienced indian meal moths before then you will want to definitely read on.

Where are all of these moths coming from???

This will be the first thing that you say. Indian meal moths seem to come from nowhere. In the beginning it’s one here or there. After a couple of days it’s three or four. The next thing you know… they’re everywhere!  Indian Meal Moth

They struck our family last summer when we were in the middle of a family emergency. We had to travel to and from Tennessee for weeks on end. It’s almost like they sensed that we had no time to find the exact source of the problem. If you can find the source of the problem quickly then you will avoid the pantry crisis. We did not have the time to look at every item in the pantry like we KNEW we should do. We opened a few items like cereal, corn starch, flour, dog food, and nuts. We found several infested foot items and considered the matter finished.

How long do indian meal moths live?

The larvae of indian meal moths can take anywhere from 2 to 14 days to hatch. An adult will live anywhere from 5 to 25 days. Of course, this is all depending on the environmental conditions. In my book, 5 minutes is too long.

The indian meal moths continued to flutter about my kitchen for days on end. The problem was becoming worse by the day. Until finally, I said enough is enough. I’m tearing apart the pantry!!   Well, I found the nasty culprit. It was a lovely tin of popcorn from Christmas (thanks Mom!) that had gotten pushed to the corner over time and forgotten about. When I opened up that tin it was like something from that scene in the movie The Green Mile where John Coffey “takes back” the bugs. There were literally hundreds of them and they swarmed out of that tin in a black cloud all around my head. To say that I invented a new dance in the kitchen of my Murfreesboro, TN home that day would be an understatement.

Indian meal moth elimination
The kitchen was a mess!

Actually, finding the source was great news! I knew that I could finally get down to solving the problem. I removed every food item AND sealed container and inspected it. Every corner and crevice. Any containers with larvae, pupae, or moth was discarded in a trash bag. Everything else was wiped down thoroughly with a soapy sponge. Every time I saw a moth I would quickly suck it up in the vacuum.

There were all stages of indian meal moths everywhere I looked: In the food, crevices of bags, crevices of boxes, the screw-on lids of herbs, cracks of wall shelving, corners of pantry, inside lip of the chip clips.   Everywhere! I even found larvae & pupae in “sealed” storage containers holding herbs and seasonings that I had blended together myself. Some things are just not as sealed as you think they are. I was very disappointed to have to throw away those blends. Herbs and seasonings can be so expensive!

Indian meal moth pupae in chip clip lip
Look closely for the cocooned pupae on inside lip of the handle of this chip clip!

The process was very time consuming, but in the end the problem was resolved. Did I mention that no pesticides were used? The solution for indian meal moths can never be accomplished with pesticides. Sometimes, the job of a professional is not in what they do but in what they know. In the work of an exterminator this is called Integrated Pest Management or IPM. Basically, it is a combination of common sense and scientific principles we use to solve a pest problem whereby we reduce the risk to the environment and people. In the case of indian meal moths, we cannot treat the food or their containers so we rely on IPM to remedy the problem.

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Chikungunya Fever and Mosquito Reduction

Chicken who?? Chikungunya.

Prevent Chikungunya and other mosquito illnessesThe Chikungunya virus has been limited to Africa and Asia for a very long time. In fact, it was first recorded in a human in Tanzania in 1953. So, this is not a new virus. But, it’s quickly becoming a hot topic in the media since it was discovered in the caribbean in December 2013. The concern is that this could soon spread to the United States in the coming year from travelers.

According to the Centers For Disease Control (CDC), the Chikunguyna virus can cause high fever, severe pain, nausea, vomiting, and headache. The disease is spread by being bitten by a mosquito that has previously bitten an infected person. It is not transmitted person to person.

The Bug Man is in the business of controlling pests and we are not medical professionals. But, because pests can spread disease and cause a variety of illnesses we are often caught in the middle of addressing the medical concerns caused by the pests. If you have any of the symptoms listed above we will always tell you to discuss them with your physician. What we CAN help with is education on what you can do to reduce your risk of being bitten by mosquitoes, in general.

The mosquitoes that carry the chikungunya virus (as well as other viruses) are the Yellow-Fever Mosquito (aedes aegypti) and the Asian Tiger Mosquito (aedes albopictus).

As of this writing, no infected mosquitoes have been found in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, or anywhere in the United States. So far the CDC is reporting that all of the documented cases of chikunguyna in the US have been in people who have recently traveled outside of the United States to a country with the infected mosquitoes.

Recommendations to reduce the mosquito population in Murfreesboro, middle Tennessee, and beyond:

To reduce your risk of being bitten by mosquitoes we have a long list of recommendations that we give to every customer on our Mosquito Management Program. Almost every item in our list involves getting rid of anything that holds standing water and/or making sure to empty and scrub items that hold water, frequently. Also, contact your City and/or County and make sure that they are treating water retention areas with a larvicide on a regular basis.

  • Dispose of old tires, tin cans, buckets, drums, bottles, plastic sheeting, or any water-holding containers.
  • Clean debris from rain gutters to allow proper drainage.
  • Fill in or drain low places (puddles, ruts, etc) in your yard.
  • Keep drains, ditches, and culverts clean of weeds and trash so water can flow properly.
  • Cover trash containers to keep out rain water
  • Check around outdoor faucets and air conditioner units and repair leaks or other causes for water puddles.
  • Empty plastic wading pools at least once per week and store indoors when not in use.
  • Make sure your backyard pool is cared for while away from the home.
  • Fill in tree holes and stumps that hold water with sand or cement.
  • Change the water in bird baths, plant pots, and drip trays at least once per week.
  • Keep the grass cut short and shrubbery well trimmed around the house where adult mosquitoes may rest.
  • Irrigate lawns and gardens carefully to prevent water from standing.
  • Eliminate seepage from cisterns, cesspools, and septic tanks.
  • Stock ornamental pools with top feeding predacious minnows.
  • Check window and door screens on the home. Be sure they are in good condition to seal out mosquitoes.
  • Wear light-colored clothing, plus long sleeve shirts and long pants for extra protection.
  • Use repellants on skin and clothing while outdoors.

    Mosquito Reduction to prevent chikungunya
    Mosquito Reduction Program by Robert at The Bug Man

In addition to these steps, The Bug Man also offers a Mosquito Reduction Program. You can read more about that service on our past blog titled Mosquitoes… The Bug Man to the rescue or feel free to give us a call at  615-217-7284.

 

Don’t worry… bee happy about beneficial insects!

Children Embrace our beneficial insects. Shouldn’t you?

Children are so fun and curious about bugs!  Little Johnny often doesn’t think twice about picking up a spider by the leg and running to show his mommy. When he shows her his discovery, mom will often scream and run as far away as possible. Johnny will inevitably laugh, uncontrollably, while mom yells “Get that thing out of here!”

Beneficial insects are fun for the children to study and read about

It’s a common story that we hear over and over.  There are so many exaggerated horror stories about various insects: Brown recluse spiders will cause your leg to fall off. Termites will eat your house down to the ground. You will surely die a terrible disease if bitten by a mosquito. Who knows where these stories come from or why. But, they create a fear in some folks that are hard to shake.

The honey bee and other beneficial insects have an important role in our environment

Take the honey bee, for example.   They are the pollinators for our food crops. Their population has been in a steady decline in recent years due to a number of factors such as viruses, parasites, poor nutrition, limited access to clean water and exposure to pesticides. WHAT??? Exposure to pesticides?? Yes, it is true. We all (including us) have a huge responsibility in taking care to protect the honey bee and other beneficial insects.

In the spring you will sometimes see huge swarms of bees in the bushes and flowering trees. Sometimes they will stick around for a few minutes and then be gone. Sometimes they will stay for a few days. It’s easy to grab that jug of bug juice or call an exterminator to get rid of them. But, if they are not in an area that will harm you or your loved ones then it is usually best to leave them to collect the pollen. The additional benefit is that your plants and flowers will be even more beautiful later on.

There are a variety of other insects that are beneficial. Usually, most people first think of ladybugs or the asian lady beetle. Absolutely! Did you know that there are more than 400 species of the lady beetles in North America? There are also lacewings, parasitic wasps, spiders, tachinid flies, pirate bugs (aaaargh!) and ground beetles, just to name a few.

Honey bee gathering pollen: We must protect our beneficial insects.
Honey bee gathering pollen: We must protect our beneficial insects.

Protecting the environment and people at the same time

As a pest control professional, our goal is to protect your home from a pest invasion. If there is a pest problem in your living space then, yes, there is a cause for concern. You will want to eliminate the problem to prevent disease and illness/injury in your family. But, if we can keep your environment safe without having a negative impact on the rest of Murfreesboro, middle Tennessee, and beyond, then we are all winning.

Shameless Plug: Calling the Exterminator Isn’t a Bad Thing

Are you ashamed to call The Bug Man? We don’t think it’s shameful that you need our help. We’re proud of you for calling us and letting us help protect your family.

Customers are interesting.

Some of them rave about pest control.
“Now, honey, let me tell ya. I love your mosquito service. I can sit in my yard all day and not get a single bite. But my friend, Jeannie. Now she’s always gettin’ bit up real bad. But I’m not, cuz y’all come out here and spray my property and you do a real good job.”

Some of them have a lot of questions about pest control.
“So is your termite service separate from your pest control? Or is it all bundled together? What if I need one and not the other? Can I do that? Is that ok? How much does that cost?”

 And, still there are other customers who call us, with what sounds like a sense of shame.
“Uh. Hi. My name is_________. Um. *nervous laughter* I’ve…*clears throat* I’ve never called an exterminator before. *sigh* Wh-wh-wha-how, uh, how much does it cost to get rid of bugs? I’ve got mice. And I have seen a few spiders. And I really don’t like bugs. I’m sorry, I’m not sure what to ask you. I’ve never needed an exterminator before…”

We named this post “Shameless Plug” because we want you to feel shameless when you call us. 

Rest easy, folks. It is ok to call the exterminator. It’s not a shameful thing to call The Bug Man. We don’t think you’re grimy and gross when you call us. Pretty much every homeowner has an encounter with bugs.

When you ask us to come treat your home, we don’t assume that it’s your fault that you’ve got bugs. We don’t imagine your home as a rickety shack destined to be featured on the show Hoarders.

Rather, we imagine you as a friendly Middle Tennessean. We envision you as a homeowner in Murfreesboro who wants to be educated on the best practices for keeping pests out. We think you’re a good mom or dad in Lebanon who wants to protect your family by keeping your home pest free.

Don’t be ashamed to call us, because we’re not ashamed of you. We are proud of you for taking care of your loved ones. And we’re honored that you let us help you do that.

Like a Moth to a Flame: Illuminating How Outdoor Lighting Affects Pests in Your Home

Learn about how the lighting scheme outside your house is related to pest control with these helpful tips.You’ve probably heard the cliche, “Like a moth to a flame,” before. But have you ever really thought about that sentence? Have you ever wondered why moths (and other flying things) are attracted to light sources? A lot of people are in the dark about outdoor lighting.

Well, here’s some illumination for you.

The lighting scheme outside your home affects how susceptible your home is to a pest invasion. Not only will flying bugs be attracted to lights, but spiders, scorpions and bats may become attracted to the bugs that became attracted to your home because of your outdoor lighting.

On a balmy summer night, it’s normal to see bugs swarming around a light. It’s not unusual for a moth to fly inside a house after hanging out at the door waiting for such an opportunity. These two common pest problems–and many others–can be prevented.

Here are a few Bug Basics when it comes to outdoor lighting:

* Many pests are attracted to fluorescent bulbs. That kind of lighting may strain our eyes. Alternatively, it makes bug eyes happy.

* Some insects are picky about their lighting. They may only be attracted to your home on an idle Thursday evening at 11:14 p.m. in June when it’s 67 degrees. Seriously. Others may like your lighting all night, every night.

* Male insects may love the way you’ve lit up your house and be attracted to it. While some female insects couldn’t care less. Isn’t that funny?

* Some insects only like your lights if they produce a lot of heat. What do they think it is, a tanning bulb, or something?

Knowing what you know now, here’s how you can adjust your outdoor lighting set up.

* Though they aren’t as bright or as attractive to humans, tinted lights attract fewer bugs. Install lights with a yellow, pink or orange hue. If it helps, pretend it’s like Christmas in July with all of your colored lights.

* If you have accidentally set up a pest tanning bulb boutique outside your backdoor, replace high-heat-halogen and incandescent bulbs with bulbs that produce less heat.

* Consider indirect lighting. Meaning, install lights that aren’t right above your doorway. Set up lights 15 to 20 feet away from your doorway that shine on your door.

* Use curtains on the windows of the rooms you hang out in at night. Even interior lighting is attractive to pests.

* Avoid shining bright lights on white walls, especially near water. Light + White Walls + Water = No Good

* To avoid the bugs that only come out at dusk (i.e. midges) set up your lights to come on two hours after the sun goes down. Pull out that trusty Christmas tree light timer and set it up with your hue lights that we wrote about earlier.

While you’re spending more time outside in the evenings, observe the pest activity near the lights outside your house. If you notice an abundance of pests hovering around one of your light sources, give us a call. We can talk through solutions to your lighting scheme.

Exposing the Brown Recluse

Debunk myths about the brown recluse through education, information and humor. And a little Monty Python…We get a lot of phone calls in our office at The Bug Man. Most of the time, the calls aren’t alarming. However, when it comes to brown recluses, most of the calm, cool, collectedness in our customers capsizes.Getting bit by bugs is usually not #1 on the list of fun for most people. Our desire is to offer educational materials and partner with you to keep your home pest free. We try to dispel the fear that comes with bugs through our pest control services as well as educational, informative, and humorous resources. Hopefully this blog will both teach you and tickle your funny bone.Please take a seat in our virtual classroom, and pull out your study materials. The bell has rung and it’s time for Brown Recluses: 101.True to their name, brown recluses usually stay away from people. They don’t prey on humans, but they do bite in defense if they are threatened. Brown recluses are active at night and will move if disturbed. They typically hang out in areas that don’t receive heavy traffic, such as in storage boxes, closets, and in piles of unused clothes on the floor.

To prevent brown recluses from getting into your storage and clothing areas, vacuum and clean as often as you can and store your items and clothes in sealed plastic containers. And, shake out any items/clothes before you put them on to try remove any spiders that may be in there.

Brown Recluse spider specimen that a customer brought in to our office

It is important to note that brown recluse venom is tricky. The size of the person, the amount of brown recluse bites and the immune system of the bitten one all have to be factored in. Some people get bitten on a Tuesday at the beginning of the month and don’t notice anything until on a Friday at the end of the month. Conversely, results of a bite could be immediately apparent. No two people are alike in the way they respond to bites. No blanket statements here. It all depends. It just depends.

Although it is widely publicized that brown recluses are deadly, a bite from a brown recluse has yet to kill someone. Many health issues are mistakenly attributed to brown recluses because of the hype associated with them. Because brown recluses are well known, they get the wrap for other skin problems, like flesh eating bacteria or bed sores.

If a person gets bitten by a brown recluse, it could lead to a large, ulcerative sore if left untreated. However, if the person bitten seeks medical attention and the help of a pest professional within a reasonable amount of time, the bite likely won’t lead to lost limbs.

Let’s put it this way, if you duke it out with brown recluses with the help of The Bug Man and a medical professional, you won’t end up like the Black Knight from Monty Python and the Holy Grail. “It’s just a flesh wound.”

Though the violin shape on the back of a brown recluse indicates what type of spider it is, it’s best to call a pest professional who can properly identify the spiders and track where they are coming from. We have two approaches to brown recluses: conservative and an infestation treatment. When possible, we try to use the conservative method to treat them. We place glue boards throughout your home to monitor where the spiders are coming from and how many of them you have.

After monitoring the amount of spider activity, we will move forward with an infestation treatment if we need to. If necessary, we will come back for several follow up appointments until the problem is totally taken care of.

Well, class, we hope you learned a lot today. We’ll see you next time!

Fruit Flies: Cause, Elimination and Education

Learn about the causes and elimination of pesky fruit flies.Tiny black minions. Foul flying fools. Little looney losers.

Fruit flies.

So you went to the store and bought some fresh fruit. You’re making a push to eat healthier. You’re going to the gym. You’re taking the stairs. You’re determined to learn how to make great smoothies with your collection of bananas, strawberries, grapes, and protein powder. You’re ready.

You’re set.

You’re UPSET!

Because you found fruit flies!

Now you wonder where the fruit flies came from. Instead of hitting the gym, you’re hitting the countertop, the table, the air, and your hands together, in an effort to smash the small, sickening sleuths.

Sad story. Sad story, indeed.

Back to Their Roots
Fruit flies hail from organic matter. Translation: Fruit flies can breed in decaying fruit, drains, and house plants. Rotting fruit is a perfect spot for a flourishing fruit fly family. Bananas are especially responsible because fruit flies lay their eggs in the stems of bananas. Drains in the kitchen, bathroom, and utility room are also popular places. And, the oft-forgotten common house plant is another huge hang out for fruit flies.

Uprooting the Rebels
Eliminating fruit flies can be tricky at times. Upon scouring the internet for you so you don’t have to, we discovered several fruit fly removal formulas. Anything from homemade funnels in sports drink bottles to Drano© to strategically placed wine glasses was suggested.

Here at The Bug Man, we have a few recommendations.

  1. Store the fruit in the fridge or dispose of whatever rotting fruit is attracting the flies. And, make a note to check your fruit at the store before you buy it to make sure no flies are nearby.
  2. After you’ve disposed of the rotting fruit, take out the trash. And while you’re doing that…
  3. Scope out the bottom of your trash or recycle bin. Is it dirty? If so, clean it.
  4. Wipe down your counters, tables and floor. Sticky, leftover residue may be attracting flies.
  5. If you have a house plant, try re-potting it. How long has that soil been in there? Was it re-potted after you bought it?
  6. Clean your drains. We recommend pouring a diluted bleach solution down your drains. Let’s pause 15 seconds for emphasis.

1…2…3…4…5…6…7…8…9…10…11…12…13…14…15…

A diluted solution. Please don’t douse your drain with a container of bleach in an attempt to be overly thorough in your cleaning quest. Use one capful of bleach per gallon of water. Little bleach. Lot water.

If you’re still seeing fruit flies after taking the steps listed above, there are several other things you can try. There are numerous variations of a vinegar/soap concoction. Opinions vary as to which one works the best. If you need a customized recommendation of what to do, please leave us a comment here. We’ll do our best to help you out.

You may now return to your pursuit of healthy living, fruit eating, and workouts at the gym.